The Best of Cardio and Healthcare News for the Week of 12/7/15 

Good news, bad news: High cholesterol rates are down, but fewer than half of patients are taking their statins
Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the cardiology community? Let us help keep you up to date on the stories you won't want to miss. The good news: High total cholesterol rates declining among U.S. adults Rates of total high cholesterol and low high-density protein (HDL) in U.S. adults decreased between 2011 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). From 2009 to 2010, 13.4 percent of adults had high cholesterol and 21.3 percent had low HDL cholesterol. From 2011 to 2014, those percentages dropped to 12.1 percent and 18.5 percent, respectively. The bad news: Most patients not making changes to reduce cardio risk Fewer than half of patients considered candidates for cholesterol-lowering treatments are actually implementing the treatments, which include exercising more, taking statin medication and losing weight. “Cholesterol treatment gaps” are greater among non-white ethnic groups in the United States than they are for Americans... read more
 

Hospitals drowning in paperwork 

Did you know that in many hospitals, every two hours of patient care causes one hour of paperwork? It's even worse for emergency rooms, which have a 1-to-1 ratio of paperwork to patient care. Those are just two of the findings in "Patients or Paperwork? The Regulatory Burden Facing America’s Hospitals." The report, by PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC), was commissioned by the AHA. 

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The best of healthcare news, week of 11/30/15 

The future of healthcare, according to one cardiologist In the future, smart phones might help prevent heart attacks and strokes. That's according to Eric Topol, MD, a cardiologist and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, who wrote an opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal. Topol predicts that patients will use their smart phones to provide doctors with continuous data on themselves, as opposed to waiting for office visits--a practice that would provide for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Doctor strikes don't increase patient deaths In wealthy countries, patient mortality doesn't suffer because of work stoppages by physicians, according to a new study published in The BMJ. Mortality rates even fell during some strikes. Researchers theorized that patient mortality didn't increase during strikes because hospitals cancelled elective surgeries and continued to offer emergency care, among other reasons. They also noted that many doctors continued to work... read more
 
Posted by 12/02/2015 Categories: healthcare reform HIPAA hospital management

Best of Cardio and Healthcare News: Week of 11/23/15  

Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the cardiology community? We've captured the top industry stories from this week that you won't want to miss. After Obamacare implementation, public still rates healthcare good or excellent Implementation of the Affordable Care Act (AKA Obamacare) hasn’t changed how Americans rate their healthcare, according to a new Gallup poll. More than half of the respondents rated their healthcare good or excellent, but less than 24 percent were satisfied with healthcare costs. Healthcare coverage was rated positively by only 33 percent. Diagnostic ECG waveform reading in Carestream Vue Motion viewer cleared by FDA The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given clearance for diagnostic reading of electrocardiogram (ECG) waveforms on mobile tablets and desktop displays using Carestream’s Vue Motion universal viewer. The new capability would allow physicians to give faster responses to ST segment elevation myocardial... read more
 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 08/16/15  

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss: Hospitals urged to review disaster planning in wake of Paris attacks Saying that French hospitals' mass casualty response can be a guide for United States, U.S. federal agencies called on providers and hospitals to review their disaster plans and to exercise "enhanced vigilance" in the days ahead, fiercehealthcare.com reports. The Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Health and Human Services this week recommended that providers and hospitals review security plans and conduct drills, hold organizational safety briefings, and make sure emergency communications equipment is functioning properly. More than 1,000 hospitals named Joint Commission 'top performers' The Joint Commission recognized more than 1,000 hospitals for their scores on health care quality measures, according to The Joint... read more
 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 08/16/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss: Hospitals urged to review disaster planning in wake of Paris attacks Saying that French hospitals' mass casualty response can be a guide for United States, U.S. federal agencies called on providers and hospitals to review their disaster plans and to exercise "enhanced vigilance" in the days ahead, fiercehealthcare.com reports. The Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Health and Human Services this week recommended that providers and hospitals review security plans and conduct drills, hold organizational safety briefings, and make sure emergency communications equipment is functioning properly. New technology supports CT as prime cardiac imaging modality The past 20 years have seen rapid growth in computed tomography over all segments of medicine, with advances in cardiac CT including FFR-CT,... read more
 

New registry to track AFib ablation procedures 

In early 2016, the ACC NCDR® is launching the AFib Ablation Registry™. According to the ACC NCDR®, this new registry will collect data on demographics, acute management, outcomes and other information for patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. “With a growing prevalence of atrial fibrillation and growing options for treatment and stroke prevention in AFib patients, the ACC saw a need for real-world data to track and evaluate the use of these new technologies,” ACC President Kim A. Williams Sr. said in a press release. The new registry is expected to: Inform practices Improve patient outcomes Help develop evidence-based guidelines for atrial fibrillation ablation treatments “AFib is a registry that many of our clients will be considering,” says LUMEDX Registry Manager Katrina Craig Valvis. “If they participate in ICD, it’s likely they will participate in AFib, because both registries are looking closely at the outcomes of... read more
 
Posted by 11/19/2015 Categories: ACC American College of Cardiology

This Week in Cardiology: 08/20/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the cardiology community? We've captured the top industry stories from this week that you won't want to miss. ACC to Launch Clinical Registries to Track Ablation, LAA Occlusion Procedures for AF The American College of Cardiology has announced the launch of two clinical registry programs, the LAAO registry and the AFib Ablation registry. The LAAO registry college data on procedural indications, outcomes and more from left atrial appendage occlusion procedures. The AFib Ablation registry collects demographic information, outcomes, and more for patients who undergo AF ablation. For more information on LUMEDX registry software, click here. Only 1 in 10 With Heart Failure Referred for Postdischarge Cardiac Rehab: Analysis According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, only 10.4% of patients hospitalized with heart failure from 2005 to 2015 were referred to a cardiac... read more
 

Best of Health IT News: Week of 07/23/15 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss. CMS Updates Hospital Star Ratings, More than 500 Earn Top Marks The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has published its latest patient satisfaction survey results, which shows that the number of hospitals earning a 5-star rating has more than doubled. 548 hospitals earned a 5-star rating for the reporting period between October 2013 and September 2014. Health Specialists Call for $2 Billion Global Fund for Vaccines Several global health experts have written a paper calling for the creation of a $2 billion global fund to support vaccine development. The fund would come from governments, foundations and the pharmaceutical industry, and would be used to develop new shots against high priority diseases such as Ebola, MERS and the West Nile virus. AMA Docs Fed Up with EHR Woes At a... read more
 

This Week in Cardiology: 07/17/15 

The past few weeks have been filled with exciting news for the cardiology community. Here are some of the top stories we've collected from around the Web: 67% of Adults Should Do This to Avoid Heart Attacks According to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (AMA), the pool of candidates that can be treated with statins can be expanded to 67% of all U.S. adults between the ages of 40-75. It is projected that this could prevent an additional 161,560 cardiovascular events, including heart attack, stroke, and others. The Lowdown on TAVR: As Risk Drops, Expectations Rise Cardiovascular Business reports on the five-year results from the PARTNER I trial (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves Trial), which show that 5 years after implant, "valves showed no signs of deterioration with durable hemodynamics." With risk down, GlobalData now projects that the compound annual growth rate for TAVR valves will increase 19.7% between 2013 and 2020. ... read more
 
07/17/2015 Categories: analytics cardio PACS pediatric cardiology