The Best of Cardio and Healthcare News for the Week of 1/11/16

Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the cardiology and healthIT communities? Let us help keep you up to date on the stories you won't want to miss.

Heart attack outcomes may improve when treatment sought earlier

Restoring blood flow quickly after heart attack symptoms begin is key to less heart damage, according to a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The study found that failure to recognize and seek treatment for early heart attack symptoms can cause increased damage to the heart. 

Heart failure cell therapy trial gets FDA approval

The FDA has authorized Celyad’s Investigational New Drug (IND) application for a CHART-2 trial in the United States. The phase III heart failure trial will initiate clinical testing of Celyad’s C-Cure cardiopoietic cells delivered via the C-Cath proprietary catheter. CHART-2 is designed to test the efficacy of C-Cure as a treatment for heart failure of ischemic origin. 

Coronary stenting often followed by additional surgery

Nearly 15 percent of patients who received coronary stents during a PCI underwent another surgery within a year of the procedure, and nearly half had more surgery within five years, according to cardiovascularbusiness.com. The website reported that nearly 80 percent of the subsequent surgeries were noncardiac in nature.

Cardiac Assist  device preserves LV function in cardiogenic shock

XENiOS’ i-COR Synchronized Cardiac Assist system protects left ventricular (LV) function compared to continuous-flow ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in cardiogenic shock, according to data presented at the recent American Heart Association annual meeting. Synchronized cardiac assist, which superimposes a physiological pulse wave onto the patient’s weakened pulse, is intended to be a less invasive treatment than the current standard.

Optimism may lead to increased physical activity, reduced readmissions following acute coronary syndrome

Two weeks after an acute coronary syndrome, patients who were optimistic were more likely  to be physically active and less likely to be readmitted to a hospital for cardiovascular reasons, according to an observational study. But gratitude didn’t help, according to researchers, who reported that gratitude following an acute coronary syndrome was not associated with improvements in readmission or more physical activity.

 

Posted by Monday, January 11, 2016 1:01:00 PM Categories: best practices cardiology data heart failure mortality outcome

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