Posts in Category: analytics

CVIS for management and analysis of cardiovascular data insights 

The CVIS: What It Is Today and Where It’s Headed

It's no secret that healthcare in the United States is moving away from the fee-for-service model toward a value-based system that reimburses for positive health outcomes. The value of improved clinical outcomes is obvious—for patients, for providers, and for payers. As the healthcare industry shifts to value-based care, measuring and monitoring outcomes becomes increasingly important. Hospitals and payers must seek new and deeper ways to track performance.

In the cardiovascular specialties, the American College of Cardiology’s National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR®) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons’ (STS) national databases have set the standards for care for decades. The data sets required by the registries, and systems that have developed around managing that data, were the foundation of the original cardiovascular information management systems.

Over time, Cardiovascular Information Systems (CVIS) grew to capture significantly more data, resulting in more automated workflows and much more complete pictures of patient care. Today’s CVIS includes hemodynamic monitoring, ECG management, Echo management, structured reporting, and Picture Archiving and Communications (PACS) systems data. The CVIS of today can—and should—provide a 360°-view of the quality of a cardiovascular service line’s clinical care.

Chris Winquist, LUMEDX President and COO, discusses the CVIS.

Registry Data – Only the Basics

Through participation in the cardiovascular registries, CV service lines can understand their level of care compared with national counterparts. The national registries produce quarterly reports on comparative clinical outcomes, and offer insights for various stakeholders, from payers to individual physicians.

However, data insights only have value when they can affect change, and to do that, they must be timely. Because ACC and STS registry outcomes reports are made available only on a quarterly basis, change can be slow. Change in the kinds of processes and practices that affect outcomes can take up to a year or more after data is collected, submitted, and then reported. By the time a facility receives its outcomes report, the data originally submitted—and thus the registry report itself—is stale.

It's also important to note that registry data is only a basic set of the total data that could be analyzed and used to affect change. With today's ability to collect a much larger set of discrete data points in an efficient manner, deeper insights are possible, and decisions about clinical and operational strategy can be made at the local level.

Today's CVIS Leverages Data to Improve Your CV Business

Historically, the healthcare industry has generated large amounts of data, driven by compliance and regulatory requirements, and the need to deliver and demonstrate evidence-based patient care. But much of that data varies in format and location, and the ability to derive meaningful insights from it has been slow.

The opportunity for data to provide valuable insights in cardiovascular care is now available. We call it LUMEDX data intelligence, and leveraging this intelligence transforms the CVIS into something that goes beyond an information repository, data warehouse, or workflow efficiency tool.

The HealthView CVIS not only collects and warehouses data, but also provides drill-down ability to gain deep insights into every aspect of cardiac care and treatment: from risk factors to specific treatment success rates, discharge medications, readmission rates, and many more.

In fact, over the last 25 years, we've captured more than 30,000 discrete data points that are available to help you track metrics against objectives, identify outliers and trends, and work to improve patient care, population health, and business outcomes—all in one place.

The kind of deep insights that the CVIS of the (near) future will deliver will have a positive impact on the hospital as both a business and a patient-care facility. HealthView brings 21st century data intelligence to bear and eliminates the problems associated with minimal, and stale, data. Heart hospitals can now have a robust and active dataset, where new data enters the system every day. This makes the path to improved care faster, and better care means shared cost savings and dramatically improved patient outcomes.   

Posted by Monday, June 06, 2016 11:58:00 AM Categories: analytics cardiology data Lumedx

Spotlight on Analytics 

The Role of Analytics in Healthcare

Industry Overview (continued)

Q&A With Gus Gilbertson, Product Manager for LUMEDX

Part 2 of our new series​. In this week’s installment, we continue our overview of the role of analytics in the healthcare industry.

Q: There’s been an increased focus on big data in other industries recently. How is the healthcare industry responding?

A: Data management is becoming an increasing focus in healthcare. Electronic Medical Records, HL-7 feeds, imaging systems, genomics, labs, and medications are all being gathered and increasingly mined for insight into health risks and outcomes. With the growing use of health, consumer, and business data--and shifts in regulatory guidelines, data governance and data resource management are growing in importance in healthcare.

Q: How is the healthcare industry different from other industries when it comes to data analytics?

A: In some ways, the EMR has been a black hole sucking in data for years, with limited options for analysis. Increasingly, a variety of tools are getting access to that data, and it is being supplemented with edge systems to create a fuller view of patient and population health.

In addition, different segments of the industry each use big data in different ways. Everyone uses big data to market to consumers. Payers and providers use it to identify care patterns. Pharmacies use it to better understand patient health and risks. Labs use big data to conduct more tests faster and cheaper, building a more complete picture of patient chemistry. Researchers use big data to help target therapies to specific sub-populations, or even to specific patients. Researchers and population-management teams are using big data to help target therapies to specific sub-populations, or even to specific patients.

Finally, regulatory bodies continue to grow their understanding of the Medicare population and how new therapies are affecting patient health and longevity. Service providers continue to use automation and natural language processing technologies to reduce service costs.

Q: Where do you see healthcare analytics going in five years?

A: Five years will come and go quickly, but I expect care quality measures will become increasingly public. Specific populations of chronic disease patients will find targeted communities that bring the fruits of big data to care patterns. Automation of diagnosis and risk profiling will make us all more keenly aware of our health.

Telehealth will become much more mainstream, supported by a variety of apps and home diagnostic solutions. In addition, healthcare risk profiles and the outcomes different risk factors influence will become a more prominent topic as individuals try to better understand how their health compares to that of relatives and the rest of the population, and look for opportunities to improve health, quality of life, and longevity.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of Spotlight on Analytics, where we’ll explore the financial challenges facing healthcare today. Part 1 of the series is below.

 

Spotlight on Analytics 

With Gus Gilbertson, Product Manager for LUMEDX

Part 1 of our new series, Spotlight on Analytics

Industry Overview

Q: What are some of the challenges the healthcare industry is facing today?

A: Population management initiatives, service bundling programs, payor and provider consolidation, expanding regulatory oversite, an aging population, and expanding quality initiatives – all are increasing value in the U.S. healthcare industry, stretching resources, but also reducing competition.

At the same time, increased healthcare coverage has increased the number of paying customers in the industry. The growing focus on risk promises to change care planning for patients with diverse health profiles, but requires new ways of looking at patient care.

In addition, the increased availability of basic health monitoring data to individuals is helping people manage their health, but incentives for lifestyle change are still evolving. Telehealth is becoming an important healthcare/population health management tool that will likely to continue to disrupt existing on-site clinic and hospital models.

And finally (unfortunately): The growth in options for physically passive content consumption will continue to lead people down a sedentary path toward obesity and cardiovascular complications.

Q: Where do you see big data analytics fitting into the healthcare industry?

A: Increasingly, as more detailed consumer data becomes more accessible to healthcare organizations, they will be better positioned to identify health risks, manage chronic conditions, and tailor care offerings to match patient health profiles. They will also be able to better target marketing and healthcare service offerings to specific populations.

On the new treatments front, genetic factor analysis is becoming faster, easier, and cheaper. The next decade will see us looking at genetic data to better understand and predict health outcomes and guide diagnostic and treatment options.

Genomic analysis and cancer-risk profiling are a growing big-data topic, with genomic data for an individual patient taking big storage.

Natural language processing (NLP) is another big-data area that we can expect to start to impact the way we communicate and get things done. Most large vendors are using natural language processing technologies to respond to simple support and service requests. NLP is also being used to understand sentiment in a wide range of categories, often driven off of Twitter feeds. Expect NLP tools to come to your EMR or health records and analyze health risks.

This concludes Part 1 of Spotlight on Analytics, an ongoing series of blog posts. Stay tuned for Part 2!

 

Posted by Thursday, May 05, 2016 10:54:00 AM Categories: analytics data health information technology HIT

The Best of HealthIT News: Week of 2/8/16  

Population health, Obamacare, and cost containment

Did you have a chance to check out the latest news from the healthIT community? Let us help keep you up to date on the stories you won't want to miss.

Companies Form New Alliance to Target Healthcare Costs

Hoping to hold down the cost of healthcare benefits, 20 large companies—including American Express, Macy’s  and Verizon—have come together to use their collective data and market power. Members of the new alliance will share data about employee healthcare spending and outcomes, possibly using the data to change how they contract for care. "Some members say they could even form a purchasing cooperative to negotiate for lower prices, or try to change their relationships with insurance administrators and drug-benefit managers," Yahoo news reports.

Federal Insurance Marketplace Signs Up Millions of New Obamacare Users

The Obama administration reports that approximately 12.7 million new patients signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, or automatically renewed their policies during Obamacare's third annual open enrollment season. Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, told the New York Times that the signups show that “marketplace coverage is a product people want and need.” Most of the plan selections were for people in the 38 states—more than 9.6 million—who used the federal website, HealthCare.gov, the Times reported. The other 3.1 million people were enrolled in states that run their own marketplaces.

Healthcare Economics: Court Allows Some Hospitals to Save Money by Classifying Themselves as Both Rural and Urban

While an earlier Health and Human Services (HHS) rule had barred both urban and rural classifications at once, a new federal appeals court ruling removed the barrier for dual hospital classification. The recent court decision applies only to hospitals within the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, but some hope that—combined with an earlier similar decision in a different circuit—the 2nd Circuit Court's ruling will inspire HHS to change the regulation across the country. "The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services allows hospitals to classify themselves as rural (which providers typically leverage for discounts on drug purchases) while also classifying themselves as urban, (an important factor to attract qualified clinicians)," according to Reuters. 

Population Health: Hospital-based Wellness Centers Are Changing the Healthcare Model

Wellness centers housed in hospitals are helping communities prioritize preventive care and management of chronic conditions. The centers are part of the population health management model that focuses on preventing illnesses rather than simply treating them when and if they occur. The idea is to get patients to seek treatment before their conditions worsen, thus easing the burden on emergency rooms and acute care centers—and saving money.

Cost Control: Surgical Safety Checklists Can Save Lives and Reduce Hospital Stays

Surgical safety checklists—if implemented correctly—can save time, lives, and money. After the checklists were implemented, one study found, the average length of a hospital stay dropped from 10.4 days to 9.6 days. In addition, the checklists led to a 27 percent drop in the risk of death following surgery. Proper and consistent implementation is critical, however, for the checklists to work.

Case study: CV Analytics Solution Ensures Consistent Quality Care for UnityPoint Health--Des Moines 

"Best outcome for every patient, every time"

High-Level View of Performance in a Few Clicks

With new analytics software, #UnityPointHealth -- Des Moines can set parameters and run the reports it needs with a few clicks of the mouse. The reports enable CV leadership to see and understand how service lines are performing in near-real time.

 

Posted by Friday, January 29, 2016 1:15:00 PM Categories: analytics cardiology data health information technology healthcare analytics performance

Moving Up to the Cloud 

Case Study: Upgrading to a Cloud-Based Reporting System

The Heart Center of Greater Waterbury used to maintain its patient records with a server-based model that required administrating and upgrading by the IS Department. Since transitioning from that client-server model to a cloud-based system, the Heart Center has seen myriad benefits, including lower costs for maintenance and improved efficiency. Read more.
 

Posted by Wednesday, January 13, 2016 9:23:00 AM Categories: analytics best practices case study Lumedx Users

An End to the Era of Dictation 

Case Study: From Dictation and Transcription into Real-Time Reporting

Orlando Health, a Central Florida healthcare system with more than 2,000 beds, until recently used dictation and transcription for all its physician reports. It was costly, time-consuming and fraught with the potential for errors. But after rolling out a new workflow, Orlando Health has trimmed 10-14 hours from report-completion time. Here’s how.
 

Posted by Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:20:00 AM Categories: analytics best practices case study Lumedx Users

Reduce Errors, Structure Data for Most Efficient Uses 

Make Your Data Work for You

Did you know that 60 percent of healthcare data is unstructured? And that 18 percent of errors are the result of inadequate information? Let LUMEDX show you how to collect data once, and use it multiple times. Click here to find out how. 
 

Posted by Monday, December 28, 2015 9:11:00 AM Categories: analytics best practices case study Lumedx Users

Hospital Cuts Door-to-ECG Time in Half 

Case Study Highlights 50 Percent Reduction in Door-to-ECG Times

Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, has dramatically cut its door-to-ECG time, from 15-16 minutes down to 8 minutes.  The hospital has also greatly accelerated its custom reporting time, and can now run near real-time reports for its physicians, drilling down to exactly the data they need. Click here to learn how they do it. 

Posted by Tuesday, December 22, 2015 8:07:00 AM Categories: analytics best practices case study EHR Lumedx Users

Best of Health IT News: Week of 08/06/15  

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

Future of Cardiology Includes Your Heart in 3D

Dassault Systemes, a French company that specializes in 3D software, has released The Living Heart Project - a 3D simulation of the human heart. With the technology, doctors can use 3D glasses to tour a patient's heart and see its muscle movements, electrical impulses, and more. 

What Are the 3 Critical Keys to Healthcare Big Data Analytics? 

A recent industry poll by Stoltenberg Consulting reveals that half of healthcare providers are confused by big data, and 6% are too intimidated to even consider implementing a healthcare big data analytics program. Health IT Analytics discusses three critical steps that hospitals need to take when developing an analytics program. 

FDA to Develop Open-Source Precision Medicine Software Platform 

According to iHealthBeat, the FDA has announced plans to develop an open source software platform that would share genomic information. The software would be a part of President Obama's precision medicine initiative. 

Telehealth Underused in Coordinating Care for Children with Special Needs

FierceHealthIT reports on a new report from the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. According to the report, telehealth should be more frequently used in order to bring services to children with special healthcare needs - especially when providers are scarce or poorly distributed. 

Page 4 of 8 << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 > >>
  • RSS

Statistics

  • Entries (226)
  • Comments (620)

Categories