Posts in Category: analytics

Webinar to Highlight a Winning Data Analysis Strategy 

Christiana Care Health System, one of the largest healthcare providers in the mid-Atlantic, has achieved wide-ranging improvements in both clinical performance and business outcomes after implementing strategies designed to ensure top-quality care delivery while at the same time containing costs.

Christiana's success began with a data strategy that will be laid out in a complimentary webinar called Delivering Clinical and Business Excellence: The Power Of Data Transparency. Subtitled How Christiana Care Leverages Cardiology Data to Improve Care Quality and Contain Costs, the webinar will take place on Thursday, Feb. 2.

It will include discussions on: 

  • How data transparency drives cost and outcome awareness and impacts the CV service line
  • Christiana Care's experience comparing the costs and benefits of undertaking a costing model
  • The value of case attributes

Presented by Leslie Mulshenock, Director of Heart & Vascular Services, and Matthew Esham, Heart & Vascular Service Line Manager, the webinar will also include a summary of the costs and benefit of Christiana's strategic improvement plan, which has resulted in optimal reimbursement, lower costs-per-case and higher patient satisfaction. 

A live Q & A will conclude the Feb. 2 event, which will take place at 1 p.m. Eastern time, 12 p.m. Central and 10 a.m. Pacific.

Click here to register for this complimentary event.

Are You Ready for the New Cardiac Bundled-Payment Program? 

Heart hospital across the country are preparing for the new mandatory bundled-payment program for cardiac care. Set to begin this July, the program makes hospitals in certain markets accountable for the quality and cost of care for bypass and heart attack patients until 90 days after discharge.

CMS predicts that the program-which also covers knee and hip replacements-will save the federal government as much as $159 million between now and 2021. In 2014, the CMS said, heart attack treatment for 200,000 patients cost Medicare more than $6 billion. From one hospital to another, the cost of treating heart attack patients varies by as much as 50 percent, according to Modern Healthcare.

The bundled-payment model allows hospitals to keep the savings they achieve if they spend less than a target price for an episode of care. However, hospitals that exceed the target price must repay Medicare. Target prices will be determined retrospectively.

LUMEDX offers a path to meeting or beating those targets. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program helps facilities gather the consolidated CV data they need to see and manage quality and cost of care in real time. The program helps CV service lines analyze their data, identify higher-risk patients and act to ensure they are performing at or better than national targets so they can keep any savings they have realized-and avoid repaying Medicare. 

Inpatient costs are likely to account for most of the cost of the 90-day bundled-payment period, and LUMEDX is uniquely positioned to help providers reduce those expenses. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program can help CV service lines contain costs while improving outcomes by reducing:

  • Door-to-balloon time
  • Door-to-Troponin-testing time
  • PCI and CABG complications
  • PCI and CABG cost-per-case variation

These are just a few of the many ways LUMEDX solutions can help heart hospitals demonstrate best-quality, best-value care delivery-and uncover the solutions to radical improvement. 

How will the bundled-payment program impact your CV service line? Share your thoughts in our comment section, below. 

3 New Clients Join LUMEDX Family 

Hospitals in Alabama, Massachusetts and Texas begin CVIS implementation

LUMEDX is happy to welcome to our family three new clients: Marshall Medical Centers; Holyoke Medical Center; and Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit healthcare organization in Texas.

The first Baylor Scott & White location to implement the LUMEDX solution is Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital in Dallas. LUMEDX is providing the hospital with comprehensive cardiovascular data management that:

  • Connects isolated data sources,
  • Integrates with the enterprise electronic health record (EHR), and
  • Eliminates redundant data collection.

Holyoke Medical Center has gone live with our PACS with Echo Workflow software. After all phases of the CVIS deployment are completed, the secure, cloud-delivered software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution will provide the medical center-located in Holyoke, Massachusetts-with comprehensive management of its Echo, Nuclear, ECG, Holter and Stress workflows, and will offer remote access for physicians, allowing them to access data and complete reports from any location.

The deployment for Marshall Medical Centers is taking place at two hospitals: Marshall Medical North in Guntersville, Alabama; and Marshall Medical South in Boaz, Alabama. Both hospitals have implemented Echo Workflow and ECG-Holter software, which will help them improve performance and quality of care while containing costs and minimizing inefficiency.

We look forward to long and productive relationships with our new partners!

 

AUC and the CVIS 

Leveraging Appropriate Use Criteria for Better Outcomes—and Collateral Benefits

Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) is intended to help physicians achieve the best outcomes using the most appropriate treatment plan for any situation. Ensuring that physicians comply with established AUC guidelines is crucial to the overall success of a facility. Demonstrated AUC excellence can impact: 

  • Patient outcomes and satisfaction
  • Hospital reputation
  • Reimbursement in the value-based care era

While the goal of all physicians is to provide best-quality, appropriate care for their patients, in the real world this can be challenging to accomplish—and to document—because of the lack of point-of-care access to complete, longitudinal patient information. Providing physicians with access to relevant patient data, and ensuring they have a clear understanding of AUC guidelines, can lead to improved outcomes—and cost savings as well. 


Rachanee Curry, LUMEDX Service Line & Analytics Consultant, explains how LUMEDX solutions help physicians access the patient data they need to comply with Appropriate Use Criteria.

Leveraging Appropriate Use for Cost Savings & More

With the shift to value-based care, service line leaders must seek out every cost-control opportunity. The good news is that there are collateral benefits to AUC compliance: In addition to improved clinical outcomes, collecting and serving up data so physicians can provide appropriate care helps heart and vascular centers improve their financial performance by:

  • Providing the right information, at the right time, to support appropriate clinical decision-making and best-quality care. When you deliver best-quality care, you are avoiding redundant or excessive treatment that can drive up costs; 
  • Delivering clinical workflows wherein quality data can be captured at or as close to the point of care as possible, optimizing efficiency and minimizing redundant manual work. This saves labor costs because clinicians spend more time on direct patient care rather than administrative tasks; 
  • Providing integrated clinical and operational data in near-real time so service line leaders can monitor their programs' performance and take action to improve.

In addition, when you demonstrate that your facility is consistently AUC-compliant, you are better positioned to work with payers on providing best-value care for that patient population. 

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS: Serving Up the Right Data at the Right Time 

HealthView CVIS helps heart hospitals navigate AUC and value-based care standards. The system collects point-of-care data and delivers actionable insights, facilitating better clinical decision-making and helping to improve business operations through increased efficiency and cost savings. 
HealthView CVIS can play a critical role in any hospital's move toward better patient care, greater efficiency, and improved fiscal performance. 


Medical Errors Are Made at an Alarming Rate 

How Integrated Systems Can Help 

Medical errors are dangerous, deadly, and all too common. Research published in The Journal of Health Care Finance found that these mistakes cost the United States $19.5 billion in 2008 alone. A 2016 study estimated that medical errors cause 251,000 deaths a year in the U.S., where they are the third-leading cause of death (after heart disease and cancer). 

To Err is Human, the groundbreaking report by the Institute of Medicine, found that nearly half of all deaths attributed to medical errors were preventable. What's even more disturbing is the limited improvement that has occurred since the publication of that 1999 report. "The overall numbers haven't changed, and that's discouraging and alarming," Kenneth Sands of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center told the Washington Post.


Mickey Norris, National Vice President of Sales for LUMEDX, discusses how a CVIS can help reduce medical errors.

Medical errors can obviously result from many factors. Some relate to process or people issues, such as the inability to read another physician's handwritten notes, verbal communication breakdowns between medical professionals, or delays in adding notes to a case after treatment occurs.

But many errors stem from the lack of having accurate, up-to-date, or complete information about a patient readily available to clinicians at the point of care. In most cases this is a technology problem, yet technology can also be the solution.

Technology Can Help Reduce Medical Errors

The best technology solutions take an analog process and make it more efficient and accurate through a digital solution. The same is true in healthcare. The effectiveness of patient treatment hinges on getting the right information in front of the right caregivers at the right time. And historically that has been a challenge because the data physicians need is often located in multiple systems. These systems don't always communicate with each other.

For example, a physician may check a pharmacy log to determine which medications have been administered to a patient. But the patient may have been given additional medications in the cath lab, which weren't documented in the same log. This lack of complete information could result in drug interactions or overdoses, or in simply repeating tests. Similarly, the results of tests conducted outside a hospital may not be immediately available to a physician in a hospital. 

Integrating critical patient data from multiple systems automatically, and making it accessible to physicians and clinicians where and when they need it, helps reduce medical errors and improve care overall. Indeed, by minimizing the "number of hands" and number of times information is entered into a system, data quality improves, as there are fewer chances of error. 

Integrating data also reduces costs, because integration minimizes duplicative manual work. Clinicians can spend less time entering redundant data into silo'd systems and more time working with patients. Complete, accessible, high-quality data and improved operational efficiency in CV care are critical to the financial success of a facility.

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS: Increase Efficiencies, Reduce Errors

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS has the ability to interface digitally with almost every point-of-care device in use, and is completely vendor-neutral. Our suite of clinical interfaces allows device and clinical system data-ECG, hemodynamic systems, PACS, cardiac ultrasounds and more-to be captured automatically so that physicians and clinicians always have the most up-to-date information at their fingertips. And our structured reporting applications and registry modules support improved workflow efficiency and clinical quality, while minimizing redundant data entry and the potential for human error. 

HealthView CVIS also complements established workflows. It collects more than 30,000 discrete data points-from point-of-care devices to physician reporting. The robust analysis and reporting engine provides meaningful insights in the areas of treatment options, clinical evaluation and training, and service-line optimization. It's an important addition to any heart hospital's electronic records system, turning it into a robust and dynamic dataset where new information is added in near real-time. Fresh, relevant data that enables better medical care is a critical step in reducing medical errors. 


Spotlight on Analytics, Part 6 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, LUMEDX Products Manager

 

The Role of Mobile & The Cloud

Q: What is the role of mobile and the cloud in the healthcare analytics industry?

A: Cloud-based technologies hold the promise of delivering better technology solutions at reduced cost. Mobile will increasingly be the platform of choice for quick updates of the most relevant information for a specific situation. Mobile platforms provide an efficient and effective way to consume healthcare analytics.

Q: What challenges and benefits do you predict will arise as mobile and cloud-based access becomes more prevalent?

A: Security protocols will have to meet standards and may limit access to specific patient data. Analytics not at the patient level will become easy to access. Increasingly, caregivers will know how their organizations are doing at meeting care quality goals efficiently. Eventually, patients may get there too.

Q: What use will healthcare organizations have for patient-generated data?

A: Over time, biometric data collection devices will become connected, cheap enough, and prevalent enough that we will all know our health metrics much better than we do today. As standards arise, healthcare organizations will have to engage with patients to better understand what stories biometrics have to tell, and patients will want to share with their providers to gain better insights into their own health. If providers are not able to deliver insights from biometric data, someone else will.

Enhancing the EHR 

Why Department-Level Systems Remain Critical to Quality 

The need for Electronic Health Records (EHRs) has become widely accepted, and methods to accelerate hospital adoption are proving to be successful, albeit resource-and cost-intensive. While EHRs are highly useful tools for collecting certain kinds of information and making that information available widely across services, cardiovascular care is complex; the data generated by this care is equally complex; and therefore cardiovascular service lines require systems that can match this complexity.


 

Chris Winquist, LUMEDX President and COO, explains how the CVIS augments the EHR to provide CV services with the deep data needed for clinical and business excellence.

Publicly Reported Measures & the Need for Deep Data

Even with the rapid pace of innovations in treatments and technologies, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.(1) Unsurprisingly, today a large percentage of publicly reported quality measures are CV measures. Further, new value-based payment models are making up-to-date tracking and managing of performance ever more critical. Demonstrating quality of care delivered has never been more central to cardiac and vascular departments. 

How can a hospital best report, monitor internally and improve quality performance in key measures like Mortality, Complications, and Appropriate Use? With discrete, queryable data. This data must be:

  • Acquired at the point of care so workflow is efficient and data is of high quality 
  • Made accessible to providers across the care continuum so they can make fully informed treatment decisions
  • Reported to the registries
Getting Actionable Information

It's not enough to report to the registries once a quarter and then hope for the best. A high-performing facility must monitor and drill-down into its own data to investigate any problems and take action-as quickly as possible. For this, service lines need systems that can capture information as queryable data elements. And these systems need to integrate with all the devices and clinical systems at work in the service line (ECGs, Stress, Holters, cardiac ultrasounds, hemodynamic systems--to name just a few). 

A dedicated departmental system-one that integrates with clinical-modality systems and the EHR, and offers automated registry data collection and submission to the full suite of cardiac and vascular registries-is the only way for complex environments like cardiac and vascular services to get the data they need to measure and improve performance (clinical, operational) in a substantive way.   

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS Enhances the EHR and Supports Operational Efficiency

With more than 30,000 discrete, queryable data points, HealthView CVIS offers the depth cardiac and vascular departments need for optimal clinical and business excellence. We've developed a powerful data engine that brings insight to every aspect of CV suite operations by drilling into details and reporting on both trending and outlier situations. 

The HealthView CVIS also accepts and transmits relevant data from and to the EHR, so that the enterprise and the service line can operate at the highest levels of efficiency, facilitating best-quality care, improved performance and cost savings.

(1) Go AS, Mozaffarian D, Roger VL, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics-2014 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2014;129(3):e28-e292.

Improving the Business Performance of Your Heart Hospital 

An effective CVIS strategy can improve the business performance of your hospital

The primary goal of any healthcare provider is to improve the lives of patients through effective treatment. However, because they are also businesses, hospitals have concerns that entail much more than this. To be viable in the long term, hospitals must manage their margins to fund their mission.
There are three main pillars of business concern for any hospital:

  • Clinical—health outcomes are measured with the goal of healthier patients leaving the facility.
  • Financial—the dollars must add up to keep the enterprise solvent.
  • Operational—staffing and facilities are measured against cost and need.

Ultimate success for a hospital demands strength in all three areas. It's incumbent upon clinicians and service line managers to work together to seek out efficiencies in each of them.


 

Praveen Lobo, VP Strategic Products

 
New Operational Realities

Payers' shift away from a fee-for-service model toward a value-based payment model demands that clinicians and administrators expand the above-mentioned pillars to include cost, patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction.

These changes aren’t easy. Providers have long been paid based on quantitative measures: the number of procedures performed. New operational realities demand new ways of measuring the qualitative value of those procedures. Reimbursement is linked to these metrics, and hospitals must find ways to leverage their investments in data technology in order to maximize their financial opportunities.


Granular Data Brings Actionable Insights

Data is critical to the shift to VBP. For example, if we know that extubation within six hours improves patient outcomes, it makes sense to monitor that metric internally on an ongoing basis. When outliers crop up, data points gathered from across the treatment spectrum can allow us to understand why. Perhaps a different treatment was needed at the outset, or some other patient health factor influenced that measure.

Over time, granular data can allow us to understand which type of treatment is best for patient outcomes in that circumstance.

It is discrete, granular data that can help providers fine-tune their processes in order to improve patient outcomes—and of course patient satisfaction. This same kind of close analysis can be applied to reducing costs. But for all three new, expanded pillars, efficient data collection, management, and analysis are needed. 

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS collects more than 30,000 discrete data points—from point-of-care devices to physician reporting. The robust analysis and reporting engine provides meaningful insights in the areas of treatment options, clinical evaluation and training, and service line optimization. HealthView CVIS is an important addition to any heart hospital's electronic records system.  

Spotlight on Analytics, Part 5 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, Product Manager for LUMEDX

Predictive Analytics

Q: How much of the healthcare industry has adopted predictive analytics?

A: By definition, negotiations between providers and payers are a game of who can better predict patient outcomes. Win-win scenarios can certainly be devised, but a lack of predictive ability puts an organization at risk for poor contract structuring.

Clinical outcomes are increasingly a game of predicting outcomes and identifying the levers that affect those outcomes so providers are able to improve on future outcomes. Operational predictions are also important, as misunderstanding patient care needs can lead to expensive outlier care patterns or care variations that break capacity management efforts and budgets.

Q: How do you see predictive analytics having an impact on healthcare organizations, and specifically on heart hospitals?

A: Outcome prediction and risk profiling will increasingly guide care pathway selection and tailor care patterns to targeted patient profiles. Predicting and applying the care pathway that leads to the best health outcome at the lowest cost is the foundation of healthcare in the value-based purchasing era.

The dynamics of heart health are increasingly being researched and documented, leading to continued technical evolution and improved outcomes. Being able to predict which technology will lead to the best patient outcomes per dollar spent--whether it be a TVR, and VAD, or an aspirin—is a crucial skill for providers.

Q: What is the role of predictive analytics in affecting areas like heart failure readmissions?

A: Estimates continue to suggest that as much as 20 percent or more of care is wasted. Access to predictive models for identifying patients at risk for readmissions--and providing better targeted treatment up front--are the keys to reducing readmission. Those who best understand their care pathways and patient risk profiles will be the ones who can provide the best value in heart failure care. They will be the ones who can best explain the risk factors inherent in their readmission outcomes to stakeholders from patients to community groups and regulators.

Stay tuned for Part 6 of this series!

 

Spotlight on Analytics, Part 4 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, Product Manager for LUMEDX

Exploring CV Service Line Analytics

Q: Where should heart hospitals begin if they want to start using data analytics?

A: Digitization is the key. Start by identifying areas where paper continues to hide data rather than illuminate care process dynamics. For all digital information, build standards for producing and consuming data so that the data collected has meaning, and those who need the information have access and know what to do with the information available.

Q: What unique challenges do heart hospitals face that can be addressed by healthcare analytics?

A: Understanding biometrics, imaging data, labs, medications, process, and outcomes measures make for a richly complex set of data to leverage to drive value in cardiovascular care.

Q: How can data analytics improve clinical care in a cardiology department?

A: With good data governance, a cardiology department can efficiently care for a variety of patients. With well-controlled processes to ensure proper procedures and medication therapies applied, patient health risks and quality of life are managed effectively.

Q: Who are the end users of an analytics product at a heart hospital? Who else should see that data and analysis?

A: The care teams are the key consumers of analytics products at a heart hospital. Clinical and administrative leaders need to know:

  • Whether health care processes are working
  • How well they are doing at achieving positive health outcomes for patients
  • What the risk profiles of their patient profiles look like compared to those of competitors and across payers

Quality, regulatory, operations, and financial stakeholders also need to understand the dynamics of the clinical, operational, and financial performance of the heart program –and where there are opportunities for improvement or celebration of achievement.

Stay tuned for Part 5 of Spotlight on Analytics, where we'll discuss Predictive Analytics. Parts 3, 2, and 1 are below.

 

Posted by Tuesday, July 12, 2016 11:08:00 AM Categories: analytics healthcare analytics healthcare reform healthcare today industry news Lumedx performance
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