Posts in Category: analytics

See You at NCDR! 

Join LUMEDX and more than 1,500 registry professionals, quality experts, cardiovascular administrators and physician from across the country at the NCDR Annual Conference next week. LUMEDX will be at Booth 5 -- stop by and say hi!

Set for March 13-15, 2017 in Washington, D.C., the conference will feature pre-conference ACC Accreditation Services Workshops. ACC Accreditation Services (formerly Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care) will offer CathLab and Chest Pain Accreditation Workshops on Sunday and Monday, March 12 and 13, prior to the conference. On Monday, March 13, there will also be NCDR Orientation 101 and LAAO Registry.

Attendees can customize the program to their own educational needs and their role on the quality team, selecting from deep-dive concurrent workshops on:

  • Registry-specific information
  • Challenging case studies
  • Engaging physicians
  • Engaging physicians

In addition to concurrent workshops and general sessions, the NCDR conference will focus on opportunities to significantly increase knowledge about using data to transform practice. Presentations from national quality leaders will present on topics including:

  • Insights into the role of registries within national quality improvement effort
  • New government payment models
  • Public reporting

We hope to see you there! Click here for an agenda overview.

Posted by Wednesday, March 08, 2017 11:20:00 AM Categories: ACC American College of Cardiology analytics best practices cardiology data Lumedx NCDR

Radial Access, Same-Day Release after PCIs Could Save $300 Million a Year 

New research shows that U.S. hospitals could save $300 million annually--and see fewer complications--if they use transradial access for percutaneous coronary interventions, and release patients on the same day.

Analysis shows that same-day, transradial PCIs cost $3,500 less than discharges that did not occur on the day of the procedure. Compared to transfemoral interventions, transradial PCIs also reduce:

  • Bleeding
  • Vascular complications
  • Transfusions

"We now have identified a mechanism for hospitals to improve their efficiency and lower costs that is associated with improved PCI outcomes simultaneously," says the study's lead author, Amit P. Amin, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, in a news release.

"Our data show there is a tremendous potential to reduce costs of PCI, reduce complications and achieve a 'win-win' for both patients and hospitals," Amin adds. "Hospitals that redesign their care pathways to perform more same-day, transradial PCIs can potentially save hundreds of thousands of dollars each year."

As this research indicates, a major part of achieving cost savings is reducing avoidable complications. But reducing PCI complications is just one part of the puzzle; CV service lines can reduce adverse events for a myriad of other procedures.

There are also opportunities to achieve cost savings in other ways, such as by improving throughput and making billing easier and more accurate. Identifying these opportunities is crucial for physicians and cardiovascular leadership.

That's where LUMEDX's Cardiovascular Performance Program comes in. This new program offers a no-charge analysis of your facility's performance on complication rates and other issues that reduce revenues. It then generates a detailed plan for improvement.

The opportunities for better clinical and financial performance are dramatic. Learn more by contacting the Cardiovascular Performance Program team at info@lumedx.com or 800-966-0699.

See you at ACC: If you'll be at ACC.17 this month, stop by and say hi at LUMEDX Booth 2411. Or schedule a meeting to find out about the latest innovative software and services that can help you improve care and dramatically reduce costs across your CV service line. 

 

Cardiovascular World Gearing Up for ACC.17 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular professionals from around the world will be in Washington, D.C., this month for the American College of Cardiology's Scientific Session and Expo -- and LUMEDX will be there as well.

Set for March 17-19, the event will feature interactive debates, education and scientific presentations. ACC.17 also offers 11 learning pathways, allowing participants to focus on their choice of topics. More than 300 sessions will offer dual CME/MOC credit.

A myriad of clinical topics will be discussed, among them:

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Acute heart failure
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Invasive cardiovascular angiography and intervention
  • Nuclear imaging
  • Pediatric/congenital cardiology
  • Vascular medicine

If you're going to ACC, stop by and say hi at LUMEDX Booth 2411: We'll be presenting the latest CV data-management tools and our new Cardiovascular Performance Program, which offers a no-charge analysis of your facility's CV service line performance on complication rates, including the associated costs -- and opportunities for improvement.  

If you'd like to schedule a one-on-one meeting with LUMEDX, click here

For ACC.17 registration information, click here

We hope to see you in D.C.!

The Promise of Predictive Analysis 

If hospitals could accurately predict which patients were going to experience complications down the road, they could intervene early with those patients, and perhaps prevent them from having to be rehospitalized. Reducing readmissions is one of the potential benefits of predictive analysis, and it’s a big one.

“We have 750 patients every day. Instead of looking at everybody, if we can look at 20 patients, that would be a great advantage,” said Jose Azar, M.D., of Indiana University Health, in an H&HN article.

Also highlighted in the Hospitals & Health Networks article is Christiana Care Health System, which has been using predictive analytics for about five years. The Wilmington, Delaware, nonprofit health system set up its homegrown analytics system in 2012 with $10 million in grant funding from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation Center.

Predictive analytics has helped Christiana Care improve on financial and utilization metrics, but administrators cautioned that predictions are no help if an organization doesn’t have the resources to respond to them. That means everyone – from doctors and care managers to nurses and social workers, and even clerical staff – needs to be ready to intervene based on predictions about patients.

“You need to be able to respond to and receive information in real time,” said Terri Steinberg, M.D., chief health information officer at Christiana Care. “That’s the cost of entry,” Steinberg told H&HN. “Without a robust care-management program, there’s no point” in making predictions.

Complimentary webinar recording available

A recent LUMEDX/Christiana Care webinar is now available as an online download or on CD. "Delivering Clinical and Business Excellence — The Power of Data Transparency: How Christiana Care Leverages Cardiology Data to Improve Care Quality and Contain Costs" can be downloaded by clicking hereIf you prefer to have a CD mailed to you, please click here.

 

Webinar to Highlight a Winning Data Analysis Strategy 

Christiana Care Health System, one of the largest healthcare providers in the mid-Atlantic, has achieved wide-ranging improvements in both clinical performance and business outcomes after implementing strategies designed to ensure top-quality care delivery while at the same time containing costs.

Christiana's success began with a data strategy that will be laid out in a complimentary webinar called Delivering Clinical and Business Excellence: The Power Of Data Transparency. Subtitled How Christiana Care Leverages Cardiology Data to Improve Care Quality and Contain Costs, the webinar will take place on Thursday, Feb. 2.

It will include discussions on: 

  • How data transparency drives cost and outcome awareness and impacts the CV service line
  • Christiana Care's experience comparing the costs and benefits of undertaking a costing model
  • The value of case attributes

Presented by Leslie Mulshenock, Director of Heart & Vascular Services, and Matthew Esham, Heart & Vascular Service Line Manager, the webinar will also include a summary of the costs and benefit of Christiana's strategic improvement plan, which has resulted in optimal reimbursement, lower costs-per-case and higher patient satisfaction. 

A live Q & A will conclude the Feb. 2 event, which will take place at 1 p.m. Eastern time, 12 p.m. Central and 10 a.m. Pacific.

Click here to register for this complimentary event.

Are You Ready for the New Cardiac Bundled-Payment Program? 

Heart hospital across the country are preparing for the new mandatory bundled-payment program for cardiac care. Set to begin this July, the program makes hospitals in certain markets accountable for the quality and cost of care for bypass and heart attack patients until 90 days after discharge.

CMS predicts that the program-which also covers knee and hip replacements-will save the federal government as much as $159 million between now and 2021. In 2014, the CMS said, heart attack treatment for 200,000 patients cost Medicare more than $6 billion. From one hospital to another, the cost of treating heart attack patients varies by as much as 50 percent, according to Modern Healthcare.

The bundled-payment model allows hospitals to keep the savings they achieve if they spend less than a target price for an episode of care. However, hospitals that exceed the target price must repay Medicare. Target prices will be determined retrospectively.

LUMEDX offers a path to meeting or beating those targets. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program helps facilities gather the consolidated CV data they need to see and manage quality and cost of care in real time. The program helps CV service lines analyze their data, identify higher-risk patients and act to ensure they are performing at or better than national targets so they can keep any savings they have realized-and avoid repaying Medicare. 

Inpatient costs are likely to account for most of the cost of the 90-day bundled-payment period, and LUMEDX is uniquely positioned to help providers reduce those expenses. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program can help CV service lines contain costs while improving outcomes by reducing:

  • Door-to-balloon time
  • Door-to-Troponin-testing time
  • PCI and CABG complications
  • PCI and CABG cost-per-case variation

These are just a few of the many ways LUMEDX solutions can help heart hospitals demonstrate best-quality, best-value care delivery-and uncover the solutions to radical improvement. 

How will the bundled-payment program impact your CV service line? Share your thoughts in our comment section, below. 

3 New Clients Join LUMEDX Family 

Hospitals in Alabama, Massachusetts and Texas begin CVIS implementation

LUMEDX is happy to welcome to our family three new clients: Marshall Medical Centers; Holyoke Medical Center; and Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit healthcare organization in Texas.

The first Baylor Scott & White location to implement the LUMEDX solution is Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital in Dallas. LUMEDX is providing the hospital with comprehensive cardiovascular data management that:

  • Connects isolated data sources,
  • Integrates with the enterprise electronic health record (EHR), and
  • Eliminates redundant data collection.

Holyoke Medical Center has gone live with our PACS with Echo Workflow software. After all phases of the CVIS deployment are completed, the secure, cloud-delivered software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution will provide the medical center-located in Holyoke, Massachusetts-with comprehensive management of its Echo, Nuclear, ECG, Holter and Stress workflows, and will offer remote access for physicians, allowing them to access data and complete reports from any location.

The deployment for Marshall Medical Centers is taking place at two hospitals: Marshall Medical North in Guntersville, Alabama; and Marshall Medical South in Boaz, Alabama. Both hospitals have implemented Echo Workflow and ECG-Holter software, which will help them improve performance and quality of care while containing costs and minimizing inefficiency.

We look forward to long and productive relationships with our new partners!

 

AUC and the CVIS 

Leveraging Appropriate Use Criteria for Better Outcomes—and Collateral Benefits

Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) is intended to help physicians achieve the best outcomes using the most appropriate treatment plan for any situation. Ensuring that physicians comply with established AUC guidelines is crucial to the overall success of a facility. Demonstrated AUC excellence can impact: 

  • Patient outcomes and satisfaction
  • Hospital reputation
  • Reimbursement in the value-based care era

While the goal of all physicians is to provide best-quality, appropriate care for their patients, in the real world this can be challenging to accomplish—and to document—because of the lack of point-of-care access to complete, longitudinal patient information. Providing physicians with access to relevant patient data, and ensuring they have a clear understanding of AUC guidelines, can lead to improved outcomes—and cost savings as well. 


Rachanee Curry, LUMEDX Service Line & Analytics Consultant, explains how LUMEDX solutions help physicians access the patient data they need to comply with Appropriate Use Criteria.

Leveraging Appropriate Use for Cost Savings & More

With the shift to value-based care, service line leaders must seek out every cost-control opportunity. The good news is that there are collateral benefits to AUC compliance: In addition to improved clinical outcomes, collecting and serving up data so physicians can provide appropriate care helps heart and vascular centers improve their financial performance by:

  • Providing the right information, at the right time, to support appropriate clinical decision-making and best-quality care. When you deliver best-quality care, you are avoiding redundant or excessive treatment that can drive up costs; 
  • Delivering clinical workflows wherein quality data can be captured at or as close to the point of care as possible, optimizing efficiency and minimizing redundant manual work. This saves labor costs because clinicians spend more time on direct patient care rather than administrative tasks; 
  • Providing integrated clinical and operational data in near-real time so service line leaders can monitor their programs' performance and take action to improve.

In addition, when you demonstrate that your facility is consistently AUC-compliant, you are better positioned to work with payers on providing best-value care for that patient population. 

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS: Serving Up the Right Data at the Right Time 

HealthView CVIS helps heart hospitals navigate AUC and value-based care standards. The system collects point-of-care data and delivers actionable insights, facilitating better clinical decision-making and helping to improve business operations through increased efficiency and cost savings. 
HealthView CVIS can play a critical role in any hospital's move toward better patient care, greater efficiency, and improved fiscal performance. 


Medical Errors Are Made at an Alarming Rate 

How Integrated Systems Can Help 

Medical errors are dangerous, deadly, and all too common. Research published in The Journal of Health Care Finance found that these mistakes cost the United States $19.5 billion in 2008 alone. A 2016 study estimated that medical errors cause 251,000 deaths a year in the U.S., where they are the third-leading cause of death (after heart disease and cancer). 

To Err is Human, the groundbreaking report by the Institute of Medicine, found that nearly half of all deaths attributed to medical errors were preventable. What's even more disturbing is the limited improvement that has occurred since the publication of that 1999 report. "The overall numbers haven't changed, and that's discouraging and alarming," Kenneth Sands of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center told the Washington Post.


Mickey Norris, National Vice President of Sales for LUMEDX, discusses how a CVIS can help reduce medical errors.

Medical errors can obviously result from many factors. Some relate to process or people issues, such as the inability to read another physician's handwritten notes, verbal communication breakdowns between medical professionals, or delays in adding notes to a case after treatment occurs.

But many errors stem from the lack of having accurate, up-to-date, or complete information about a patient readily available to clinicians at the point of care. In most cases this is a technology problem, yet technology can also be the solution.

Technology Can Help Reduce Medical Errors

The best technology solutions take an analog process and make it more efficient and accurate through a digital solution. The same is true in healthcare. The effectiveness of patient treatment hinges on getting the right information in front of the right caregivers at the right time. And historically that has been a challenge because the data physicians need is often located in multiple systems. These systems don't always communicate with each other.

For example, a physician may check a pharmacy log to determine which medications have been administered to a patient. But the patient may have been given additional medications in the cath lab, which weren't documented in the same log. This lack of complete information could result in drug interactions or overdoses, or in simply repeating tests. Similarly, the results of tests conducted outside a hospital may not be immediately available to a physician in a hospital. 

Integrating critical patient data from multiple systems automatically, and making it accessible to physicians and clinicians where and when they need it, helps reduce medical errors and improve care overall. Indeed, by minimizing the "number of hands" and number of times information is entered into a system, data quality improves, as there are fewer chances of error. 

Integrating data also reduces costs, because integration minimizes duplicative manual work. Clinicians can spend less time entering redundant data into silo'd systems and more time working with patients. Complete, accessible, high-quality data and improved operational efficiency in CV care are critical to the financial success of a facility.

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS: Increase Efficiencies, Reduce Errors

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS has the ability to interface digitally with almost every point-of-care device in use, and is completely vendor-neutral. Our suite of clinical interfaces allows device and clinical system data-ECG, hemodynamic systems, PACS, cardiac ultrasounds and more-to be captured automatically so that physicians and clinicians always have the most up-to-date information at their fingertips. And our structured reporting applications and registry modules support improved workflow efficiency and clinical quality, while minimizing redundant data entry and the potential for human error. 

HealthView CVIS also complements established workflows. It collects more than 30,000 discrete data points-from point-of-care devices to physician reporting. The robust analysis and reporting engine provides meaningful insights in the areas of treatment options, clinical evaluation and training, and service-line optimization. It's an important addition to any heart hospital's electronic records system, turning it into a robust and dynamic dataset where new information is added in near real-time. Fresh, relevant data that enables better medical care is a critical step in reducing medical errors. 


Spotlight on Analytics, Part 6 

Q & A with Gus Gilbertson, LUMEDX Products Manager

 

The Role of Mobile & The Cloud

Q: What is the role of mobile and the cloud in the healthcare analytics industry?

A: Cloud-based technologies hold the promise of delivering better technology solutions at reduced cost. Mobile will increasingly be the platform of choice for quick updates of the most relevant information for a specific situation. Mobile platforms provide an efficient and effective way to consume healthcare analytics.

Q: What challenges and benefits do you predict will arise as mobile and cloud-based access becomes more prevalent?

A: Security protocols will have to meet standards and may limit access to specific patient data. Analytics not at the patient level will become easy to access. Increasingly, caregivers will know how their organizations are doing at meeting care quality goals efficiently. Eventually, patients may get there too.

Q: What use will healthcare organizations have for patient-generated data?

A: Over time, biometric data collection devices will become connected, cheap enough, and prevalent enough that we will all know our health metrics much better than we do today. As standards arise, healthcare organizations will have to engage with patients to better understand what stories biometrics have to tell, and patients will want to share with their providers to gain better insights into their own health. If providers are not able to deliver insights from biometric data, someone else will.

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