Posts in Category: health information technology

Integrated clinical analytics opens new vistas for healthcare providers 

The explosion of available health data is giving organizations the opportunity for the first time to leverage critical data analysis for key services such as financial and clinical decision support management.

This week, a report from Transparency Market Research (TMR) found that the global IT spending on clinical analytics reached $11.6 billion in 2015 and is projected to reach $32.4 billion by 2024.

The high demand of integrated clinical analytics solutions stems from their dynamic nature and ability for users to extract data from clinical documents synched with the system, such as (electronic health records) EHR, using the data to generate key insights, TMR said.

As a result, this spending makes sense when seen as the means to leverage programs offering actionable insight previously unavailable to healthcare leaders, Stefano Bertozzi, dean and professor of health policy and management at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, said recently in Healthcare IT News.

"But to the extent that we are increasingly able to correct for other factors that create differences, Big Data can reveal what the differences in performance really are," he said. "And, as a result, what are the interventions that are effective for improving the performance."

LUMEDX is leveraging analytics for healthcare leaders to access new insights in key operations. LUMEDX's HealthView Analytics and Cardiovascular Performance Program (CPP) delivers immediate access to the clinical and financial information needed for success in value-based healthcare: registry, outcomes, and risk data; operational data; physician scorecards; and more.

By offering meaningful analytics that enable you to monitor, measure, and improve all aspects of CV services, LUMEDX's data intelligence tools and packages help drive performance while reducing costs.

 
 

How the CVIS Strengthens the EHR  

Electronic Health Records are essential tools for healthcare organizations. But they don't obviate the need for a Cardiovascular Information System (CVIS). In fact, changing payment models, new government mandates, and evolving care practices are making the CVIS more important than ever.

Both the clinical and operational aspects of cardiovascular services are highly complex, and they require a technology solution that can match the complexity of the services themselves. A comprehensive CVIS is specifically designed to collect and manage the vast amount of data required by cardiovascular services, and works in tandem with the EHR by:

  • Capturing queryable data to enable analytics and support outcomes improvements
  • Facilitating structured reports
  • Providing the level of detailed information needed to care for heart patients

Learn why cardiovascular services require dedicated information systems in our white paper, "Bridging the Gaps: A True CVIS and the EHR." This document outlines how the CVIS complements the EHR so cardiovascular services can improve efficiency, reduce costs and deliver best-quality patient care. The paper is the result of communications and observations with current LUMEDX clients, as well as with prospective clients who have completed a deep-dive comparison of our CVIS with their EHR systems.

Download your copy today.

Cardiovascular World Gearing Up for ACC.17 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular professionals from around the world will be in Washington, D.C., this month for the American College of Cardiology's Scientific Session and Expo -- and LUMEDX will be there as well.

Set for March 17-19, the event will feature interactive debates, education and scientific presentations. ACC.17 also offers 11 learning pathways, allowing participants to focus on their choice of topics. More than 300 sessions will offer dual CME/MOC credit.

A myriad of clinical topics will be discussed, among them:

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Acute heart failure
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Invasive cardiovascular angiography and intervention
  • Nuclear imaging
  • Pediatric/congenital cardiology
  • Vascular medicine

If you're going to ACC, stop by and say hi at LUMEDX Booth 2411: We'll be presenting the latest CV data-management tools and our new Cardiovascular Performance Program, which offers a no-charge analysis of your facility's CV service line performance on complication rates, including the associated costs -- and opportunities for improvement.  

If you'd like to schedule a one-on-one meeting with LUMEDX, click here

For ACC.17 registration information, click here

We hope to see you in D.C.!

The Promise of Predictive Analysis 

If hospitals could accurately predict which patients were going to experience complications down the road, they could intervene early with those patients, and perhaps prevent them from having to be rehospitalized. Reducing readmissions is one of the potential benefits of predictive analysis, and it’s a big one.

“We have 750 patients every day. Instead of looking at everybody, if we can look at 20 patients, that would be a great advantage,” said Jose Azar, M.D., of Indiana University Health, in an H&HN article.

Also highlighted in the Hospitals & Health Networks article is Christiana Care Health System, which has been using predictive analytics for about five years. The Wilmington, Delaware, nonprofit health system set up its homegrown analytics system in 2012 with $10 million in grant funding from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation Center.

Predictive analytics has helped Christiana Care improve on financial and utilization metrics, but administrators cautioned that predictions are no help if an organization doesn’t have the resources to respond to them. That means everyone – from doctors and care managers to nurses and social workers, and even clerical staff – needs to be ready to intervene based on predictions about patients.

“You need to be able to respond to and receive information in real time,” said Terri Steinberg, M.D., chief health information officer at Christiana Care. “That’s the cost of entry,” Steinberg told H&HN. “Without a robust care-management program, there’s no point” in making predictions.

Complimentary webinar recording available

A recent LUMEDX/Christiana Care webinar is now available as an online download or on CD. "Delivering Clinical and Business Excellence — The Power of Data Transparency: How Christiana Care Leverages Cardiology Data to Improve Care Quality and Contain Costs" can be downloaded by clicking hereIf you prefer to have a CD mailed to you, please click here.

 

ACC, NCDR Events Coming Up This March in Washington, D.C. 

March will be a busy month for the health IT and cardiology communities. If you need an excuse to visit Washington, D.C., in the spring, these events are it. Here's what's coming up:

  • LUMEDX's ACC User Group: March 13, 2017, featuring complimentary education sessions for LUMEDX clients
  • NCDR's Annual Conference:  March 13-15, 2017, which brings together 1,500 registry professionals, quality experts, CV administrators and physicians
  • ACC's 66th Annual Scientific Sessions & Expo: March 17-19, 2017, featuring educational opportunities ground-breaking science and interactive debates and discussion

Both the User Group and NCDR Annual Conference will take place at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, Washington, D.C.  ACC.17, also in the nation's capital, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

Going to NCDR or ACC? Stop by the LUMEDX booth to say hi. We'll be at Booth 2411 for ACC; our NCDR booth number is 5.

Click here to register for any of these events.

Related: ACC says Trump's travel ban will prevent some cardiologists from attending its Scientific Sessions & Expo this March. 

Posted by Tuesday, January 24, 2017 4:47:00 PM Categories: ACC cardiology health information technology healthcare today industry news Lumedx NCDR

Are You Ready for the New Cardiac Bundled-Payment Program? 

Heart hospital across the country are preparing for the new mandatory bundled-payment program for cardiac care. Set to begin this July, the program makes hospitals in certain markets accountable for the quality and cost of care for bypass and heart attack patients until 90 days after discharge.

CMS predicts that the program-which also covers knee and hip replacements-will save the federal government as much as $159 million between now and 2021. In 2014, the CMS said, heart attack treatment for 200,000 patients cost Medicare more than $6 billion. From one hospital to another, the cost of treating heart attack patients varies by as much as 50 percent, according to Modern Healthcare.

The bundled-payment model allows hospitals to keep the savings they achieve if they spend less than a target price for an episode of care. However, hospitals that exceed the target price must repay Medicare. Target prices will be determined retrospectively.

LUMEDX offers a path to meeting or beating those targets. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program helps facilities gather the consolidated CV data they need to see and manage quality and cost of care in real time. The program helps CV service lines analyze their data, identify higher-risk patients and act to ensure they are performing at or better than national targets so they can keep any savings they have realized-and avoid repaying Medicare. 

Inpatient costs are likely to account for most of the cost of the 90-day bundled-payment period, and LUMEDX is uniquely positioned to help providers reduce those expenses. Our Cardiovascular Performance Program can help CV service lines contain costs while improving outcomes by reducing:

  • Door-to-balloon time
  • Door-to-Troponin-testing time
  • PCI and CABG complications
  • PCI and CABG cost-per-case variation

These are just a few of the many ways LUMEDX solutions can help heart hospitals demonstrate best-quality, best-value care delivery-and uncover the solutions to radical improvement. 

How will the bundled-payment program impact your CV service line? Share your thoughts in our comment section, below. 

Latest Healthcare Cyberattack Highlights Need for Prevention 

How would you like to have to tell 34,000 patients that their data had been hacked? That’s the situation that Quest Diagnostics found itself in recently after hackers stole health information including names, birth dates, telephone numbers and lab results.

The clinical laboratory services company is just the latest victim in a long string of cyberattacks targeting protected health information. One in 13 patients stand to have their records stolen because of a healthcare provider breach, according to Accenture, an industry consulting firm. Healthcare organizations that have been the recent target of cybercriminals include:
Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, which paid a $17,000 ransom in bitcoin to regain control of its computer systems after a hack.
Anthem Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer, which had the records of nearly 80 million customers stolen.
MedStar Health, where hackers encrypted data from 10 hospitals, causing widespread confusion and delays in treatment because providers were unable to access records.
What can healthcare providers do to protect against such cyberattacks? We’ve collected a number of articles offering advice.
Tips for protecting hospitals from ransomware as cyberattacks surge
Hospitals Battle Data Breaches With a Cybersecurity SOS
Protecting a vulnerable industry against cyber attacks
5 Ways Providers Can Prevent Patient Data Breaches

What is your organization doing to protect itself from hackers? Share your strategies in our comments section below.

AUC and the CVIS 

Leveraging Appropriate Use Criteria for Better Outcomes—and Collateral Benefits

Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) is intended to help physicians achieve the best outcomes using the most appropriate treatment plan for any situation. Ensuring that physicians comply with established AUC guidelines is crucial to the overall success of a facility. Demonstrated AUC excellence can impact: 

  • Patient outcomes and satisfaction
  • Hospital reputation
  • Reimbursement in the value-based care era

While the goal of all physicians is to provide best-quality, appropriate care for their patients, in the real world this can be challenging to accomplish—and to document—because of the lack of point-of-care access to complete, longitudinal patient information. Providing physicians with access to relevant patient data, and ensuring they have a clear understanding of AUC guidelines, can lead to improved outcomes—and cost savings as well. 


Rachanee Curry, LUMEDX Service Line & Analytics Consultant, explains how LUMEDX solutions help physicians access the patient data they need to comply with Appropriate Use Criteria.

Leveraging Appropriate Use for Cost Savings & More

With the shift to value-based care, service line leaders must seek out every cost-control opportunity. The good news is that there are collateral benefits to AUC compliance: In addition to improved clinical outcomes, collecting and serving up data so physicians can provide appropriate care helps heart and vascular centers improve their financial performance by:

  • Providing the right information, at the right time, to support appropriate clinical decision-making and best-quality care. When you deliver best-quality care, you are avoiding redundant or excessive treatment that can drive up costs; 
  • Delivering clinical workflows wherein quality data can be captured at or as close to the point of care as possible, optimizing efficiency and minimizing redundant manual work. This saves labor costs because clinicians spend more time on direct patient care rather than administrative tasks; 
  • Providing integrated clinical and operational data in near-real time so service line leaders can monitor their programs' performance and take action to improve.

In addition, when you demonstrate that your facility is consistently AUC-compliant, you are better positioned to work with payers on providing best-value care for that patient population. 

LUMEDX HealthView CVIS: Serving Up the Right Data at the Right Time 

HealthView CVIS helps heart hospitals navigate AUC and value-based care standards. The system collects point-of-care data and delivers actionable insights, facilitating better clinical decision-making and helping to improve business operations through increased efficiency and cost savings. 
HealthView CVIS can play a critical role in any hospital's move toward better patient care, greater efficiency, and improved fiscal performance. 


Early Reaction to MACRA Rule Mostly Positive 

Last weekend was a busy one for those trying to parse the new MACRA rule released on Friday. At 2,202 pages, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act rule wasn't exactly beach reading, and it gave the health IT community plenty to talk about on social media and in policy statements.

The dust is still settling, but it appears that early reaction to the rule was mostly positive. Healthcare organizations praised the CMS for being responsive to concerns they had raised during the comment period leading up to the rule's finalization. In fact, about 80 percent of the 2,000+ pages are comments CMS received and its responses.
The American Medical Association was pleased with the permanent elimination of the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula. "The new law," according to the AMA's press release, "gives many physicians the opportunity to be rewarded for the improvements they make to their practices and for delivering high-quality, high-value care to Medicare patients."
Other features that drew favorable reactions included:

  • The rule's overarching theme that improving the organization and payment models for medical care must stress quality over quantity.
  • Greater reporting flexibility for clinicians, as well as support for innovation in the delivery of care.
  • The formal adoption of a transition year during 2017, which makes major changes to the Quality Payment Program (QPP) reporting requirements, and provides a longer time frame for those transitioning to the QPP.
  • Emphasis on helping clinicians educate themselves about the rule.
  • Easing of the policy defining the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM), which will allow additional programs to quality.

But the rule is not without its detractors. "It's disappointing that the flexibility provided for quality reporting in 2017 largely disappears in 2018 and beyond," the Medical Group Management Association said in a policy statement.
Other organizations complained that the nominal risk standard defining the Advanced APM remains too high.

Want to know more? Healthcare Dive has a great breakdown of the rule changes you need to know. And for even more information on the new rule, click here. 
What's your take on the final MACRA rule? Share your thoughts in our comment section below.

Clinician mobile device use increasing as healthcare organizations struggle to protect data 

The number of clinicians who use smartphones and other mobile devices on the job is rising rapidly, and so is the number of facilities that have created mobile device management strategies to cope. "Organizations with a documented mobility strategy have nearly doubled, and in-house use of pagers has increased slightly during the past two years," according to Health Data Management.

Almost 90 percent of physicians surveyed reported using smartphones, while about half of nurses and other staff members use them. In response, more than 60 percent of hospitals surveyed have a documented mobile device strategy. (The survey, by mobile messaging service vendor Spok, included responses from about 550 hospitals.)
The leading mobile devices used in hospitals are:

  • Smartphones (78 percent)
  • In-house pagers (71 percent)
  • Wi-Fi phones (69 percent)
  • Wide-area pagers (57 percent)
  • Tablets (52 percent)

Security and privacy, of course, are huge concerns for those setting mobile device policy, leading some organizations to forbid clinicians to use personal devices for work-related communication. About 80 percent of surveyed hospitals with such policies cited fear of data breaches as the reason behind their rules. 

Click here to download the survey.
What's the mobile device policy at your organization? Share your thoughts with the LUMEDX community by commenting below. 

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