Posts in Category: health IT

Building Your Healthcare IT Team: How to Find the Right Talent 

According to a recent HIMSS Analytics’ survey, there’s one industry where job growth isn’t slowing – and that’s in healthcare IT. According to the survey, which focused on the healthcare IT workforce, more than 85% of survey respondents said that they had hired at least one employee in 2012. And on top of that, 79% of respondents indicated that they were looking to hire additional staff in the coming 12 months.

In fact, organizations are currently having a difficult time hiring enough candidates to fulfill projects and meet deadlines. Though outsourcing projects is an option, this presents a problem once healthcare organizations need to sustain IT systems with upgrades, modifications, and more.

As EHR adoption continues to ramp up, healthcare organizations are facing a challenge when it comes to hiring for their IT teams. Nearly half of respondents said that they had to place an IT initiative on hold due to staffing shortages. Even when businesses did find candidates who fit their needs, a quarter of respondents said that other offers took away their IT employees – thereby impacting the business and putting projects like EHR upgrades, integrations, and new system installations on hold.

 As salaries for IT leaders in healthcare continue to grow and the hiring market becomes more competitive, what should hospitals and healthcare facilities do when looking for the right talent?

LUMEDX Senior Technical Recruiter Josh Jozwik shares some thoughts on why healthcare leaders need to start hiring IT personnel to keep up with competing businesses – and how to seek that talent.

Why should we invest in IT personnel?

Josh explains that the benefits of investing in IT personnel are apparent. “Organizations can realize significant ROI to improve and optimize operational, financial, and clinical outcomes by utilizing existing and new IT systems and solutions,” he says. “Specialized healthcare IT professionals can fulfill roles from custom module software development to systems administration, data analytics, and business intelligence.”

In this increasingly competitive marketplace for experienced healthcare IT talent, how do organizations win?

As a recruiter, Josh understands that organizations have to be creative when it comes to staffing for IT positions.

“Although traditional methods of HR job postings or using outsourced headhunters can bring mixed results, finding creative solutions to recruiting the best talent does not have to be an ordeal,” he says. “Organizations can focus on internal talent and equity to fulfill healthcare IT staffing initiatives by encouraging less technical staff to enroll in college or online certification programs such as database development, analytics or business intelligence report development, and training courses from healthcare IT vendors like LUMEDX.”

What about social media?

“You have to successfully brand your organization as an ‘employer of choice’ in order to attract top candidates,” Josh says. “This can be achieved with low cost marketing campaigns leveraging social media channels such as LinkedIn and Twitter. Both active and passive candidates can be found on a channel like LinkedIn, and HR recruiters can locate and network with specialized professionals who fit their hiring profile. If you’re looking for a job or are looking to hire the right candidate, you should be on these kinds of channels.”

What are your thoughts on hiring for healthcare IT right now? Sound off with your thoughts and ideas in the comments below.

Best of Health IT News: Week of 7/18/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

EHRs ‘transforming’ care, says Tavenner

Healthcare IT News covers the news of how EHRs are becoming widely adopted and are transforming care. 80% of eligible hospitals and more than 50% of eligible professionals have adopted EHRs and received meaningful use incentive payments.

Physician’s take on transition to Stage 2 Meaningful Use

Dr. Manuel Lowenhaupt talks to EHR Intelligence about strategies that healthcare organizations and providers can use to take on meaningful use. He covers how to prepare for meaningful use, as well as strategies for involving staffers and colleagues effectively.

Availability of cardiac CT streamlines cath lab use, lowers costs

TheHeart.org covers a study that found that when CT screening became available, the cost of diagnostic tests and percentage of repeat patients goes down.

What are top business challenges, prospects for physicians?

In EHR Intelligence, a study of 300 physicians shows that the top three business challenges for physicians are: managing shifting reimbursements with payors, financial management, and spending time with patients.

Health IT hiring remains a challenge

FierceHealthIT reports on how healthcare IT is currently a hot job market and how many healthcare providers have had to put IT projects on hold due to staff shortages.

Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:49:00 AM Categories: cardiology electronic health records health IT HIT hospitals industry news

Best of Health IT News: Week of 7/11/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

These Graphs Show How Fast Hospitals Are Adopting Computers – And How Far They Have to Go

In Forbes, we see a visual representation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s annual report on health information technology in the United States. The graphs show that hospitals are adopting healthcare IT at a rapid pace, but that there is still a need for hospitals to continue investing in technology.

Cardio Notes: ICD Codes Don’t Capture All Strokes

According to Med Page Today, researchers have found that an uncommon type of stroke needs its own ICD-9 code. Cardiologists and researchers believe that with a dedicated or modified code, they would be able to identify these cases more accurately.

5 Ways IT helps make sense of costs

Jeff Rowe of Healthcare IT News discusses the different ways in which adopting healthcare IT can help a facility to collect and synthesize cost data.

Healthcare jobs growth tops all others

Healthcare IT News reports on the growth of jobs in the healthcare space. According to Brookings Institution, the healthcare industry has added 2.6 million jobs in the U.S. in the past decade – accounting for a 22.7 percent employment growth.

New health data outs doctors whose patients die more often

VentureBeat covers a new plan from the U.K. government that requires doctors and consultants to submit performance data in order to show patients how different healthcare providers across England are performing.

 

My Job at LUMEDX: Barbara O'Brien  

Product Education Trainer Learns Something New Every Day

Barbara O’Brien is a Product Education Trainer at LUMEDX. She also is the voice behind the demos of LUMEDX’s free e-learning materials, which consist of step-by-step lessons, video demos, PDF guides, and task simulations that can be accessed 24/7.

What do you do at LUMEDX?

I work as a LUMEDX software product education trainer and conduct on-site instruction in Bellevue, on-site training at hospitals, and webinar classes. I started out in the Training department 10 years ago as a Documentation Writer, and I plan to stay here. Within six months of starting, I moved from being a writer to a trainer. Amazingly, I love what I do now just as much as I did when I first started. The job changes, but so do I.

I work with two other long-term employees. Even though I’ve been here for 10 years, I still find that my colleagues are great mentors and have helped me grow in my career. At work, I always try to represent the company in the most positive and professional manner possible. If I didn’t, my mom would yell at me!

What have you learned from working with our clients?

In working with our clients, I’ve learned that training is not a one-way street. We’re all students. I have never taught a class where I haven’t learned something from a student. After each class, I’m a little smarter. With any luck, the students are too!

What is your favorite part of working with our clients?

I love helping clinical staff make improvements that save lives.

I also like the challenge of working with software. Software is like anything else in life – you have to understand it to love it. And to understand it, you have to spend time with it. It’s incredibly fun and gratifying to get our customers to the point where they love the software and completely understand it.

How has your experience working at LUMEDX changed over the years?

There have been a couple ways in which my experience has changed over the years:

Teaching Method

Ten years ago, I was a young and naïve trainer. I thought that when you taught, you used an agenda, went through all the topics, and called it a day. Students would either get it or not. Now, I know that people learn in different ways. It’s my job to teach and to help our clients succeed. If someone doesn’t understand at first, it’s my responsibility to come at the subject from a different angle until they grasp the concept.

Comprehension

I’ve heard people say that you know you’ve fully comprehended a subject when you can teach it to your grandmother.  Over the years, I’ve learned that it’s not just important to teach students how to follow steps – they need to be able to understand the steps well enough to teach them to someone else. Now I try to always incorporate a “why” element into every subject that I teach. Asking why you’re doing something helps students achieve fuller comprehension.

Are there any aspects of your job that have surprised you?

Yes! After 10 years at a job, I thought I’d get bored. I’m not at all. I don’t think monotony will ever arrive, since every day brings something new. I learn new things daily, whether it’s a technical skill, a clinical aspect, or even a valuable life lesson – it doesn’t matter.

I’ve learned that I need to be receptive to learning something every day – and that learning is exciting. My hope is to impart some of what I learn to my students in a way that keeps them as excited about learning as I am!

Tuesday, June 25, 2013 8:31:00 AM Categories: careers health information technology health IT HIT industry news Lumedx

Best of Health IT News: Week of 6/21/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

North American Health IT Market Forecast to Reach $31.3B by 2017

According to HIT Consultant, the North American health IT market is forecast to reach $31.3 billion by 2017, up from $21.9 billion in 2012.

11 Ways to Make Healthcare IT Easier

CIO covers 11 ways to help healthcare CIOs make improvements in their business. Tips include integrating data analytics, hiring the best EHR trainers, using mandates to enforce change, and more.

Former ONC deputy coordinator is new AMA president-elect  

FierceHealthIT reports that Robert M. Wah, M.D., has been named the president-elect of the American Medical Association. Wah served as the first deputy coordinator for the ONC from 2005-2006.

Government agency launches health IT webpage for long-term care providers

In other ONC news, the agency just launched a new webpage with info and resources for long-term and post-acute (LTPAC) providers.

Best of Health IT News: Week of 6/14/13 

Did you have a chance to check out the latest healthcare IT news stories around the Web? We’ve captured the top industry news stories from this week that you won’t want to miss.

Federal Officials Detail Health IT Industry Progress, Challenges

iHealthBeat covers Farzad Mostashari’s remarks at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society’s 2013 Government Health IT Conference. Mostashari said that the U.S. health system today has work to do in terms of realizing his vision where “every encounter and every patient has access to all the world’s knowledge.”

EHR Association reveals Code of Conduct

The HIMSS EHR Association just released an EHR Developer Code of Conduct, according to PhysBizTech. The code addresses issues of patient safety, interoperability, dodcumentation, privacy and security, and patient engagement.

The Importance of Health IT Adoption – From a Parent’s Perspective

Dan Bowman of FierceHealthIT shares a personal take on health IT adoption – and why it’s important to him as a parent.

What Will Google Glass Do For Health?

The big buzz these days is around Google Glass – but what can it do for healthcare? HealthITNews reports on how the device can be instrumental in allowing doctors and surgeons to view and share patient information – even if they’re scrubbed up for a procedure.

HHS, CMS, and ONC Release Federal Health Data  

On Friday we talked about how meaningful data can help physicians and other providers improve care and achieve business success. This Monday, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced that HHS, CMS, and ONC have released new federal health data as part of a mission to create a more transparent health care marketplace and to help researchers and consumers make informed decisions.

This release of information highlights the importance of monitoring your facility’s data, improving clinical and financial performance metrics, and ensuring that numbers are accurate. As health care data becomes more public, it is likely that more consumers will turn to metrics when choosing care options and providers. It is therefore critical that health care facilities not only deliver the highest quality care but also maintain accurate data that reflects their success.

Some notable information released includes:

What do you think of the latest release of federal health data? How has your facility used meaningful data to improve health care? 

The Importance of Data in Health Care  

On the White House Blog this week, United States CTO Todd Park speaks of a data-powered revolution in health care. He argues that data-powered tools change the way that clinicians and health care facilities respond to patient need and provide care – for the better. As Park puts it, “[Data-powered IT tools] are helping clinicians and patients get the latest and greatest evidence-based, life-saving best practices at their fingertips. And much more.”

As we move into an increasingly evidence-based health care system, it becomes critical for providers to embrace data for numerous reasons.

Meaningful data allows clinicians and hospital staff to make informed decisions to improve quality of care.

In his post, Park talks about how data-powered IT tools are “enabling clinicians to analyze their patient population, understand who needs help (including and especially patients who haven’t been able to come into their office), and proactively reach out and give those patients the care they need.”

In addition, being able to monitor and analyze clinical data allows facilities to understand where programs are working – and where they need improvement.

Aggregating data from different areas allows facilities to see the bigger picture.

Instead of keeping data separate across various repositories, creating a comprehensive system allows health care providers to see how their organization is doing on a macro level. By seeing the full picture of a facility’s data – financial and clinical – management can see how business practices affect clinical performance.

Quality data means higher facility performance.

Registries, insurance companies, and third-party payers are now, more than ever, closely examining a facility’s numbers. By ensuring that the data they provide is error-free, health care facilities can accurately represent their performance and receive maximum reimbursements.

At LUMEDX, we believe that the data-powered revolution in health care is well underway and look forward to seeing how innovations continue to shape and improve patient care. How do you see data shaping care delivery at your facility?

My Job at LUMEDX: Kathy Sorensen 

Clinical sales consultant uses frequent flyer miles to travel to Africa

Describe your professional background and what brought you to work at LUMEDX.
I was trained as a radiologic technologist. I worked in hospitals for 10 years, seven of those in the cath lab. I got an opportunity to work for a device company and was ready for a change. I took it, and have been on the vendor side for 23 years now.

Is there an average day for you? 
Every day is a bit different. I travel to hospitals to do demos for cardiology departments looking to purchase a CVIS. Those demos can be a couple of hours to a week. When I am not on the road, I do demos via WebEx (a web conferencing application). I also train new employees, and work with engineering and product development. I have been at LUMEDX for 14 years, so I do a bit of everything.

How have health IT and hospitals changed since you’ve been in the industry?
Healthcare has changed a great deal over the last 25 years. Departments used to be able to purchase what they wanted with limited oversight. Economic changes and government regulations have changed the way products are purchased. The timeline for decision making is much longer.
However, some of these regulations have required cardiology departments to focus much more on improving performance and outcomes. LUMEDX can help our clients with these types of challenges.

What would someone from outside the industry find surprising?
I guess most people don’t think that hospitals are businesses. Although the first goal of all hospitals is to take care of patients, they also have to watch finances and, ultimately, the bottom line. It is getting harder and harder for hospitals to meet these very different goals.

How has LUMEDX changed since you’ve started working here?
We have grown tremendously. I used to know everyone. I don’t anymore.

You get to keep the frequent flyer miles you rack up as part of your job. Have you used those miles to go anywhere interesting?
I used miles to fly to Africa and back. This June, I am using miles to fly business class to Italy. I also got my best friend a business class ticket with miles as well. My safari to Africa was a long-held dream. I took a three-week trip with friends to celebrate our 50th birthdays. We went to Botswana, Zambia and South Africa. So I like traveling for work and of course also for pleasure. 

Monday, April 22, 2013 11:42:00 AM Categories: careers health IT Lumedx

How to Get a Job at LUMEDX (And How Not To) 

We know many visitors to our website are interested in career positions. The following is a  guest post from the blog of consulting firm ProLango featuring LUMEDX Technical Recruiter Josh Jozwik offering tips on what to do and what not to do when applying for a position at LUMEDX.

By Paul Anderson

There are job seekers who research company e-mail addresses and spam them with their resumes with the hopes of getting a job. These techniques won’t help you land an interview with LUMEDX, a medical software company in Bellevue, says Josh Jozwik, a technical recruiter for the company.

Jozwik says job seekers need to avoid the traditional job-hunting techniques if they’re looking to get an interview with his company. Here are other things he says job seekers should avoid:

Cover letters: Most cover letters sent to LUMEDX offer little or no value to Josh or his hiring team. Many cover letters he sees tend to be templates found on traditional resume books. If you’re going to send a cover letter, Josh suggests you send a short paragraph and bullet list on how your accomplishments might meet the company’s objectives. If there are shortcomings on your resume, this is the opportunity to address them. 

Applying for every position listed: There is a misconception that if you send enough resumes to a company, you might get their attention. Applying for every position listed shows that you’re desperate, you lack a sense of career direction, and are just trying to meet your unemployment numbers. Quality is more important than quantity, says Jozwik.

The number of resumes in LUMEDX’s Applicant Tracking System (ATS) has grown by over 60 percent in the last two years alone. Josh and his team are inundated. While the openings are scarce, the techniques shared below can help you land an interview with his company:

LinkedIn introductions: Josh is connected to 90 percent of the staff in Bellevue. If you’re hoping to get an informational meeting with the company, chances are you’ll have to go through him. While you could use job boards or apply on the company website directly, Jozwik is a big advocate of LinkedIn introductions. See if you know someone who can vouch for you and introduce you to the company.

LinkedIn discussions: Jozwik and his team monitor certain LinkedIn groups carefully and reach out to interesting participants. Visit Josh's profile, notice which groups he’s a member of and join them. Review the questions and comments other members are posting on these groups and contribute your expertise. Your involvement can help you shine with LUMEDX and other corporations monitoring these sources.

Employee referral: While it’s impossible for the company to look at every resume submitted for each position, they take their referrals seriously. In fact on their career site, they have a tool called “Are you on LinkedIn: Do you know anyone at LUMEDX?” By clicking on this tool, you can see who you might already know who can introduce you to the company.

If you’re a technology professional with medical experience and you use the techniques mentioned above, your odds have greatly increased in getting an interview with the company.

Reposted with permission from ProLango Consulting.

Thursday, April 18, 2013 4:09:00 PM Categories: careers health IT Lumedx
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